Writer in a Browncoat

One hoopy frood, aiming to misbehave. I write, I sing, I dream, I geek. Only some of these will show up on the blog. Any questions? Ask away!

steve rogers + cards against humanity (insp.)

(Source: buckkybbarnes, via marvelbunny)

poyzn:

#11 was done on The Office to Dwight.

(via marvelbunny)

comicsalliance:

REVIVAL, REINVENTION, RESURRECTION: THE POWER OF GREAT SUPERHERO COSTUME DESIGN
By Andrew Wheeler
We live in a time of awesome superhero costumes in comics. The rise and rise of cosplay culture, the emergence of comic artists with a savvy understanding of fashion, and the slow diversification that’s making heroes palatable to a broader audience, have all contributed to a costuming culture with more to offer than capes and pants.
Superhero costumes have always been an asset to the industry, because iconography helps establish character and create a brand. But the value of costumes in reaching audiences and reinventing characters seems to be recognized now as never before, leading to the rise of artist-designers like Jamie McKelvie and Kris Anka, who don’t even need to be on a particular book in order to be called in to make-over the characters. This is a great leap forward in understanding just what a good costume can do — and the special skills required to do it.
READ MORE

comicsalliance:

REVIVAL, REINVENTION, RESURRECTION: THE POWER OF GREAT SUPERHERO COSTUME DESIGN

By Andrew Wheeler

We live in a time of awesome superhero costumes in comics. The rise and rise of cosplay culture, the emergence of comic artists with a savvy understanding of fashion, and the slow diversification that’s making heroes palatable to a broader audience, have all contributed to a costuming culture with more to offer than capes and pants.

Superhero costumes have always been an asset to the industry, because iconography helps establish character and create a brand. But the value of costumes in reaching audiences and reinventing characters seems to be recognized now as never before, leading to the rise of artist-designers like Jamie McKelvie and Kris Anka, who don’t even need to be on a particular book in order to be called in to make-over the characters. This is a great leap forward in understanding just what a good costume can do — and the special skills required to do it.

READ MORE

(via marvelbunny)

“Cheating isn’t always kissing, touching, or flirting. If you gotta delete text messages so your partner won’t see, you’re already there..”

—   (via insomniaticparadise)

(via mappingmaven)

4x01: I’ve got you vs You’ve got this - Requestes by takeiteasykate

(Source: lunaticforkatic, via rubyushagrid)

favorite character meme: sarah manning

[1/4] relationships: alison

(via rubyushagrid)

poetrymafia:

I just found what may be the best description of Orphan Black, season one: “Sarah hopes that cleaning out a dead woman’s bank account will solve all of her problems. Instead, her problems multiply - and so does she.

(via rubyushagrid)

lots-of-plaiditude:

Plaid Skinny TieHeart it on Wantering and get an alert when it goes on sale.

I told Miyazaki I love the “gratuitous motion” in his films; instead of every movement being dictated by the story, sometimes people will just sit for a moment, or they will sigh, or look in a running stream, or do something extra, not to advance the story but only to give the sense of time and place and who they are.

"We have a word for that in Japanese," he said. "It’s called ma. Emptiness. It’s there intentionally."

Is that like the “pillow words” that separate phrases in Japanese poetry?

"I don’t think it’s like the pillow word." He clapped his hands three or four times. "The time in between my clapping is ma. If you just have non-stop action with no breathing space at all, it’s just busyness, But if you take a moment, then the tension building in the film can grow into a wider dimension. If you just have constant tension at 80 degrees all the time you just get numb."

—   Rogert Ebert, on Hayao Miyazaki (via metalbiceps)

(Source: improv-is-easy, via thewerebunny)